/page/2

factorykat:

rythos:

tooquirkytolose:

~And they lived happily ever after~

This was really dumb and a lot of fun to draw :D

THIS IS THE BEST AND CUTEST THING I’VE READ IN A LONG TIME <3

Now that’s a happy ending heck yeah

(via bulletprooffabulous)

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

(via bulletprooffabulous)

seifukucat:

it’s very important that i am both cute and powerful

(via tallythor)

tallestsilver:

german castles.

Lol bye I’m moving to (one of) my ancestral land.

(Source: oliviapopes)

yeahwriters:

f3nnekin:

inner—utopia:

Bless that one person in every group that is like “keep going, I’m listening” and encourages you to finish your story even when everyone else is talking over you.

Bless them!

cyprith:

official-sciencesideoftumbler:

alejo-alejo:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

This is scary

The apple face thing tho

You know the best part about this? The scary leg roller thing? It would actually work.

Sorta.

See, our lymph system uses fluid to move toxins out of our body. But sometimes that fluid can’t always get where it’s going. One of the places it gets stuck most often is around the calves and ankles.

That’s why pregnant people’s feet and ankles swell. The baby presses down on the lymph nodes located in the groin area and fluid can’t exit appropriately, ends up settling in the legs instead of leaving.

So this machine is just sort of massaging the lymph fluid upwards. It hits the appropriate nodes, gets shunted over to the bladder (or sent on about its lymphy journey) and ta da! Most people who sat for this machine would actually have slenderer legs when they came out, due to relocated lymph fluid.

Of course, if you’re prone to that sort of swelling, you’ll have chubby ankles again in a couple of hours (or a day or two), but it’s still neat!

medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

(via medievalpoc)

the-science-llama:

Exploring Mt Lemmon again with my new lens. Did some Star Trails this time, showing about 30 minutes of Earth’s rotation.. Perseids are coming soon btw!Flickr // 500px

the-science-llama:

Exploring Mt Lemmon again with my new lens. Did some Star Trails this time, showing about 30 minutes of Earth’s rotation.. Perseids are coming soon btw!
Flickr // 500px

gwyndor:

coining the word ‘sadisfaction’ for pleasure derived from making your favourite characters and in turn yourself absolutely miserable

(via bulletprooffabulous)

starsmahogany:

cinnasghost:

cameoamalthea:

221cbakerstreet:

they’re so CUTE

If Lupita is the real life Disney Princess, can Jennifer be the real life quirky side kick?

image

Even the “pulling the dress up” part is accurate

(via tallythor)

cyprith:

oh my god they ARE though.

cyprith:

oh my god they ARE though.

(Source: roseriku)

medievalpoc:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

This goes right into the “books" and "resources" tags.

I’ve featured quite a few of these books for Fiction Week, and I know that many educators would be interested in a list like this. Thanks for making it.

medievalpoc:

ladramaclub:

William Shakespeare’s Timon Athens performed by the Los Angeles Drama Club / Shakespeare in the City. These are mostly underprivileged kids from an underfunded and underserved who have been given an opportunity to break out of their hard situations.

Check out LADC at
www.losangelesdramaclub.com/

I was moved seeing these young children performing Shakespeare with such animation, enthusiasm, and skill.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

factorykat:

rythos:

tooquirkytolose:

~And they lived happily ever after~

This was really dumb and a lot of fun to draw :D

THIS IS THE BEST AND CUTEST THING I’VE READ IN A LONG TIME <3

Now that’s a happy ending heck yeah

(via bulletprooffabulous)

kingsleyyy:

this hedgehog is cheering for u bc u can do anything image

(via bulletprooffabulous)

seifukucat:

it’s very important that i am both cute and powerful

(via tallythor)

tallestsilver:

german castles.

Lol bye I’m moving to (one of) my ancestral land.

(Source: oliviapopes)

yeahwriters:

f3nnekin:

inner—utopia:

Bless that one person in every group that is like “keep going, I’m listening” and encourages you to finish your story even when everyone else is talking over you.

Bless them!

cyprith:

official-sciencesideoftumbler:

alejo-alejo:

merisea:

How Beauty Procedures Looked In The 1930s-40s [x]

This is scary

The apple face thing tho

You know the best part about this? The scary leg roller thing? It would actually work.

Sorta.

See, our lymph system uses fluid to move toxins out of our body. But sometimes that fluid can’t always get where it’s going. One of the places it gets stuck most often is around the calves and ankles.

That’s why pregnant people’s feet and ankles swell. The baby presses down on the lymph nodes located in the groin area and fluid can’t exit appropriately, ends up settling in the legs instead of leaving.

So this machine is just sort of massaging the lymph fluid upwards. It hits the appropriate nodes, gets shunted over to the bladder (or sent on about its lymphy journey) and ta da! Most people who sat for this machine would actually have slenderer legs when they came out, due to relocated lymph fluid.

Of course, if you’re prone to that sort of swelling, you’ll have chubby ankles again in a couple of hours (or a day or two), but it’s still neat!

medievalpoc:

Medievalpoc Presents: History of POC in Math and Science Week, 8-3-14 through 8-9-14!

Medievalpoc’s first Patreon Milestone Goal has been reached, and the History of POC in Math and Science Week is happening soon! This all-new themed week will focus on the contribution of people of color to the fields of mathematics, science, physics, medicine, natural philosophy, and much, much more!

There will be a focus on primary documents with interactive elements, visual and documentary evidence, innovators and their biographies, and notable personages of color from the Islamic Golden Age, Medieval Europe, African Empires and Universities, Asian images and texts, and discussion about early modern globalization regarding how this knowledge traveled.

If you have an article, image, document, or commentary you would like to submit, here’s your chance to weigh in on this topic! Please use the “Math and Science Week” and any other relevant tags for your submission, and I look forward to hearing about your favorite mathematicians and scientists of color!

(via medievalpoc)

the-science-llama:

Exploring Mt Lemmon again with my new lens. Did some Star Trails this time, showing about 30 minutes of Earth’s rotation.. Perseids are coming soon btw!Flickr // 500px

the-science-llama:

Exploring Mt Lemmon again with my new lens. Did some Star Trails this time, showing about 30 minutes of Earth’s rotation.. Perseids are coming soon btw!
Flickr // 500px

gwyndor:

coining the word ‘sadisfaction’ for pleasure derived from making your favourite characters and in turn yourself absolutely miserable

(via bulletprooffabulous)

starsmahogany:

cinnasghost:

cameoamalthea:

221cbakerstreet:

they’re so CUTE

If Lupita is the real life Disney Princess, can Jennifer be the real life quirky side kick?

image

Even the “pulling the dress up” part is accurate

(via tallythor)

cyprith:

oh my god they ARE though.

cyprith:

oh my god they ARE though.

(Source: roseriku)

medievalpoc:

behind-the-book:

High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle School lists)

Read More

This goes right into the “books" and "resources" tags.

I’ve featured quite a few of these books for Fiction Week, and I know that many educators would be interested in a list like this. Thanks for making it.

medievalpoc:

ladramaclub:

William Shakespeare’s Timon Athens performed by the Los Angeles Drama Club / Shakespeare in the City. These are mostly underprivileged kids from an underfunded and underserved who have been given an opportunity to break out of their hard situations.

Check out LADC at
www.losangelesdramaclub.com/

I was moved seeing these young children performing Shakespeare with such animation, enthusiasm, and skill.

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

(Source: rebelsandrec, via tallythor)

About:

A photo (and other!) prompt blog to help you find inspiration and get over your creative block. Let these images inspire you however you like! Create a character, find a setting, come up with a theme - write something short, something long, or whatever suits your fancy.

Following: